5 Ways To Earn Your Coach's Respect

Whether your child has a coach they love and respect or one they aren’t too fond of, gaining their respect should be a top priority.

In their minds, respect might equate to more playing time, but let them know that that's not always the case. The reason they should be looking to get on the good side of their coach is because of the impact it will have on their life today and in the future. They might not get that concept now, but they will when they are a little older and they'll really appreciate it.

So what can your child do to earn the respect of their coach?

Be on time

For practices, and for pre-game warm-ups. Hopefully, your child’s coach likes to start on time and he will greatly appreciate punctuality. Believe me, he will remember the kids who are constantly late.

Be a team player

Kids hear this all the time from parents and coaches, but until a coach sees this in action, it has not really sunk in. Being a team player means your child leads by example by playing the position the team needs, is not possessive of playing time or points, and encourages his teammates.

Be coachable

I don’t care if your child is the best player on the team. I don’t care if his dad is a professional athlete. I don’t care how many clinics and camps your child has been too, if he is not teachable and not willing to listen and learn from his coach, he will have a hard time winning favor. Coaches like players who listen and do what they’ve been instructed to do.

Be a hard worker

My husband, who coached for 28 years in three sports, loved players who exhibited a good work ethic. These are kids who don’t do drills half heartedly or look for ways to get through practice quickly and easily. They are athletes who are willing to put in extra time if needed to work on a skill. Simply put, coaches love athletes who are not afraid of hard work!

Be committed

Your child may not be the most skilled player on the team, but if he or she gives 100% in every game and practice, the coach will notice. You can tell the players who play “with heart” because they hustle, they dive for balls, and they give their best effort in everything they do.

If your child plays for a coach who he never feels like he can please no matter how hard he tries, encourage him to follow these five suggestions anyway. Even if they do not earn him favor, they will make him a valuable asset to his team.

What other things do you think your child can do to earn the respect of their coach? Tell us about them in the comments below. 

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